Should You Really Be Worried About Abbreviating 2020?

Jan 16, 2020 | Internet Scam & Alerts




ITRC_SS_2020_553811536-1030x687 Should You Really Be Worried About Abbreviating 2020?

After much debate, it turns out abbreviating 2020 is not dangerous after all. When something gets posted online, there is a good chance that it can take on a life of its own. That seems to be what happened to an interesting tidbit of advice, posted by a Twitter user at the start of the new year. The advice said that you should not abbreviate the year (writing “20” instead of “2020”) due to fraud and forgery concerns because someone could add additional digits to the end of your “20” and change the year on your document.

From there, the advice about abbreviating 2020 not only went
viral but it also somehow grew in magnitude and severity. The information has
now been shared by police departments and other experts in different parts of
the country. Some reports even said that authorities have issued a warning.

Fortunately, this seems to be a very small cause for
concern. Someone could add their own two digits to the end of the date if you
simply wrote “20,” changing the date to “2007,” for example. However, you have
to ask yourself how that would benefit someone and what harm could it actually
do to you.

Luckily, a well-thought-out explanation of the risks and worries of abbreviating 2020 can be found here. The only documents that could really be negatively impacted by abbreviating 2020 would already have the type-written date beside the signed date. Other documents, like some tax return forms, already have the precise number of blanks for you to write the date. However, your checks, for example, are not really in danger; after all, how does it benefit a thief to change the year on a check?

There are some really important reminders that come from
this story, and they are relevant no matter what year it is.

  • Some viral posts are nothing more than a hoax, and others like this one start out as a gentle warning. That does not make them dire or dangerous
  • People tend to share posts that seem to be great advice on the surface—such as the infamous “Facebook is going to start using your photos unless you copy and paste this onto your wall right now!” hoax—but those posts can sound scarier as they make the internet and social media rounds
  • Good habits should not be ignored

The good habits you develop to protect yourself can actually
help you in different ways. It does not hurt anything to write out “2020”
instead of just the last two digits. And if writing out the year makes you more
aware of your privacy and the need to protect yourself, then, by all means,
write it out.

Other good habits to focus on this year include avoiding phishing scams, not sharing social media posts that are not fact-checked, maintaining strong password security and hygiene and monitoring all of your accounts for any signs of suspicious activity. If any of those habits are not clear, check out the information at the Identity Theft Resource Center’s helpful website to learn more about how to protect yourself this year. Be sure to follow the ITRC on Facebook and Twitter for up-to-date information as well.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at 888.400.5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

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